CUTICLES ITCH AFTER GEL NAILS: YOU CAN STOP IT NOW

Cuticles itch after gel manicure can be stopped.

After you get your pretty gel manicure done at a salon or by yourself, your cuticles start to itch so badly and whether you just had your first gel manicure or many times before, you wonder what went wrong.

Cuticles itch after gel polish because the immune system reacts to some chemical components in the gel polish and liquid products used in a manicure. If these liquid chemical products are not given enough time to evaporate completely before cuticle oil or hand lotion is applied, they will stay on the cuticles and cause them to itch.

The itch will go away if all the chemical liquids are allowed to evaporate away from cuticles.

For now, let’s find out what you can do to make the itch go away quickly.

Gel polish might cause these conditions

First, if you have any of the following symptoms associated with gel nails, then the quick and simple way in this article can help you to stop the severe itch:

  • Uncontrollable itch on cuticles.
  • Swollen, red cuticles.
  • Nothing you do seems to reduce the itch.
  • Any irritation on cuticles after gel nail polish.

If you are experiencing any one of the above, try the remedy below. It will help to reduce the itch on your cuticles.

There are two steps in this method. First, you remove all the cuticle oil or hand lotion that you put on your fingers and then you will continue to remove all the remaining nail chemicals that are still on your cuticles. After you do these two steps, your cuticles will not have any thing that can cause any itch just like before your gel manicure.

A quick, simple way to stop cuticle itch after gel nails:

What you need:

  1. One large plastic container that can fit both hands
  2. 5 cups of warm water
  3. 4 teaspoons of hand or dish soap
  4. 1 old toothbrush or soft bristle nail brush
  5. 1 dry towel
  6. 1 heater fan or hairdryer

Procedure:

  • Add soap, warm water into the plastic bowl and mix thoroughly using both hands.
  • Soak both hands while you sitting down.
  • Gently brush cuticle on each fingernail for 30 seconds in a clockwise, circular motion.
  • Repeat the above step with now brush nails in a counterclockwise, circular motion.
  • If the itch does not lessen, repeat the two steps above one more time.
  • Replace the warm water with soap if it gets cool.
  • Do the above three steps for 15 minutes or as time allowed.
  • Remove your hands from the plastic bowl and dry.
  • Discard the water in the plastic bowl. Remember you will use an electrical hairdryer or heater fan next so do practice safety.
  • With the hairdryer or heater fan at low heat and low speed, put both hands in front to dry your cuticles.
  • Adjust the distance between your fingers and the hairdryer so you can tolerate the heat for at least 5 minutes.
  • If the severe itch lessens, turn off the hairdryer or fan.

If your hands are so dry and you want to moisturize them, you can but exercise caution not to let lotion get to your cuticles. If you can, keep your hands lotion-free until the next day or when the itch is gone.

By now the itch should subside to a level that you can tolerate. It will take some time before it will be completely gone but hopefully now you can go to sleep without having the itch keeping you up.

Good luck and sweet dreams.

Come back to this article the next day to find out which specific nail products that give you the itch.

If you find this article helpful and it might help someone you know, please share or pin it.

Happy gelling.

Related article:

Another chemical product you put on your nails that causes your cuticles to itch, and it might not be the gel polish. Cuticles itch after a gel manicure is caused by failure to remove all cuticle remover from the nails. Cuticle remover contains sodium or potassium hydroxide which is used to soften and break down excess skin tissue for easy removal but if left too long it will interact with the lower layer of skin and cause the itchy irritation. You can learn how to avoid it in this article.

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